The King's Speech
See Saw Films (12/10/2010)
Biography, History
In Collection
#490
0*
Seen ItNo
013132313092
IMDB   8.1
118 mins USA / English
DVD  Region 1
Helena Bonham Carter Queen Elizabeth
Colin Firth King George VI
Guy Pearce Edward VIII
Michael Gambon King George V
Geoffrey Rush Lionel Logue
Timothy Spall Winston Churchill
Jennifer Ehle Myrtle Logue
Derek Jacobi Dr. Cosmo Lang
Max Callum Royal Footman
Harry Sims BBC Technician / Soldier
James Currie Binky
Sean Talo BBC Technician / Soldier
Filippo Delaunay Undercook
Tim Downie Duke of Gloucester
Naomi Westerman Crying girl
Dick Ward Butler
Freya Wilson Lilibet
Anna Reeve Cook Younger Royal Nanny
Anthony Andrews Stanley Baldwin
Roger Parrott Neville Chamberlin
Claire Bloom Queen Mary
Eve Best Wallis Simpson
Ramona Marquez Princess Margaret
Dominic Applewhite Valentine Logue
Calum Gittins Laurie Logue
Ben Wimsett Anthony Logue
Roger Hammond Dr. Blandine-Bentham
Director
Tom Hooper
Producer Emile Sherman
Paul Brett
Iain Canning
Peter Heslop
Bob Weinstein
Harvey Weinstein
Writer David Seidler
Cinematography Danny Cohen
Musician Alexandre Desplat


Tells the story of the man who became King George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth II. After his brother abdicates, George ('Bertie') reluctantly assumes the throne. Plagued by a dreaded stammer and considered unfit to be king, Bertie engages the help of an unorthodox speech therapist named Lionel Logue. Through a set of unexpected techniques, and as a result of an unlikely friendship, Bertie is able to find his voice and boldly lead the country through war.
Edition Details
Release Date 12/10/2010
No. of Disks/Tapes 1

Notes
Candidates for president and prime minister choose to run, but kings rarely have a choice. Such was the case for Prince Albert, known by family members as Bertie (Colin Firth), whose stutter made public speaking difficult. Upon the death of his father, George V (Michael Gambon, making the most of a small part), the crown went to Bertie's brother, Edward VIII (Guy Pearce), who abdicated to marry divorcée Wallis Simpson. All the while, Bertie and his wife, Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter, excellent), try to find a solution to his stammer. Nothing works until they meet Australian émigré Louis Logue (Geoffrey Rush), a failed actor operating out of a threadbare office. He believes Bertie's problem stems from emotional rather than physiological issues, leading to a clash of wills that allows the Oscar®-winning Rush (Shine) and the Oscar-nominated Firth (A Single Man) to do some of their best work (in a neat bit of casting, Firth's Pride and Prejudice costar, Jennifer Ehle, plays Logue's wife). All their efforts, from the tense to the comic--Bertie doesn't stutter when he swears--lead to the speech King George VI must make to the British public on the eve of World War II. At a time when his country needs him the most, he can't afford to fail. As Stephen Frears did in The Queen, Tom Hooper (HBO's Elizabeth I) lends vulnerability to a royal figure, showing how isolating that life can be--and how much difference a no-nonsense friend like Logue can make.